Despite the obvious challenges in making a board game based on the price of retail items, manufacturers have made several attempts at adapting TPIR for a home market.  Here's a look inside each of the box games:
 THE PRICE IS RIGHT
(Lowell 1958)
CONTENTS:
    Eleven large prize cards (9 regular prizes and 2 Grand Prizes)
    A deck of 34 regular price cards (28 with dollar values, plus 6 Bonus cards)
    Eight Grand Prize price cards
    Four cardboard Individual Bid Recorders
    One plastic Master Bid Recorder
 
GAME PLAY:
        Based on the simple rules of the original TPIR.  For each prize, players take turns bidding (through a maximum of three rounds) trying to come closest to the retail price without going over. As on the show, players can freeze at any time, and can underbid in the first round if they think earlier bidders have already gone over.
        In addition, any player dealt a Bonus card can play for one of the two Grand Prizes. A player making a guess at a Grand Prize must come within $500 without going over to win it.  (The player checks the total himself, and right or wrong, cannot bid on a Grand Prize for the rest of the game.)
        First player to win three prizes (including regular as well as Grand Prizes) wins the game.
 
BUT HOW ARE THE PRICES DETERMINED?
        For each regular item that goes up for bids, each player is dealt two price cards. Dollar values on the cards range from $10 to $1000, and a chart with all the values is available to the players.  The "actual" retail price of an item is the total of all the price cards dealt out, and is therefore a mystery until bidding is over. Bonus cards have no dollar value. In play, the price of a regular prize tends to be around $1,500.
        For each of the two Grand Prizes, three Grand Prize price cards are dealt face down, and the retail price is the sum of these higher-value cards. In play, a Grand Prize tends to be worth around $6,000.
 
DIFFERENCES TO TV SHOW:
        Surprisingly similar, actually.  Since you're not actually pricing an item, the strategy is different, but the flow of the game is just about the same.  The idea of the Bonus cards leading to an attempt at a Grand Prize is unique to the box game, but the box game also doesn't contain any of the arbitrary "bonus" items that made the TV show an unpredictable kick.
 
COMMENTS:
        A nice feature of this format is that it allows all players to compete without the need of a separate host.  Players take turns being the "Bid Master" who deals cards and keeps track of high bids, but since the value of an item is a mystery to everyone, the Bid Master can play along too.
 BID IT RIGHT: THE PRICE IS RIGHT
(Milton Bradley 1964)
CONTENTS:
    Four decks of fifteen cards (numbered 1-15, representing "bids" of $10-$150)
    Fifteen larger prize cards (valued from $10-$150)
    Milton Bradley Bucks
 
GAME PLAY:
        Loosely based on the simple original TPIR format. Prize cards are shuffled and revealed to the players one at a time.  Each player uses one card from his deck to "bid" on each prize.  High bid (even if higher than the retail price) wins the item.  Ties cancel each other out, allowing a lower bid to win the prize. Bid cards cannot be reused, so outwitting your opponents and saving high bid cards for larger prizes is important.  Player with the highest value of merchandise after all cards have been played is the winner.
 
DIFFERENCES TO TV SHOW:
        Even though it has some superficial similarities, it's not really the same game.  It's a strategy card game that could just as easily be played for points as for prizes.  The most obvious differences are that the prices of the items are never in question, and bids higher than retail value can still win an item.
 
COMMENTS:
        A rare example of a carefully designed and clever game associated with a game show that it really doesn't resemble.  Like any good card game (UNO comes to mind) it's simple to learn and not particularly taxing to play.
 
THE NEW PRICE IS RIGHT
(Milton Bradley 1973)
CONTENTS:
    Color-coded decks of cards used for a variety of pricing games
    Three large double-sided cardboard playfields
    Host's Marker Dial
    Small cardboard chips for use in various games (True/False, Higher/Lower and numbers 0-9)
    Milton Bradley Bucks
 
GAME PLAY:
        The first home version based on the long-running Bob Barker series features a qualifying game, six pricing games and a showcase.  The qualifying "Strategy Game" is a scaled down version of the Bid It Right card game above.  The winner of the Strategy Game plays one of six pricing games:         As on the show, the two top money winners face off in the Showcase.  After all six games and the Showcase have been played, the player with the highest value in prizes (usually but not necessarily the Showcase winner) wins the game.
 
BUT HOW ARE THE PRICES DETERMINED?
        In most cases, there are three or four relatively similar prices on each prize card, and the host simply chooses whether price A, B C or D will be the "right" price for that game. The Numbers Game has dozens of different combinations of digits on separate cards.
 
DIFFERENCES TO TV SHOW:
        Everybody competes to play every game, so one player might end up playing several different pricing games over the course of the contest.  The qualifying game is completely different than Contestants Row, but the pricing games themselves are reasonably good adaptations.  This is an adaptation of the early thirty-minute version of the TV show, so there is no Big Wheel for a Showcase Showdown.
 
COMMENTS:
        The qualifying game is time-consuming to play, especially considering it's the least interesting part.  The games themselves obviously turn on luck rather than pricing skill, but can still be fun to play.
 
CHANGES IN SECOND EDITION (1974):
Completely new cover art.  Similar game play with these seven pricing games: CHANGES IN THIRD EDITION (1976):
Again, completely new cover art.  This time, the Strategy Game has been replaced with a One Bid Game similar to Contestants Row.  Five pricing games included with the third edition: There's also a spinner used to play the Showcase Showdown.  It has the same values in its twenty slots as the TV wheel, though not in the same order.  Also in this edition, some prizes have many more possible prices than the three or four choices in the earlier editions.  Each prize in the One Bid Game, for example, has thirty different possibilities.
 
COMMENTS:
    Both the second and third editions introduce a lot more tiny cardboard chips and markers that are very difficult to handle, much less keep sorted in the box.  A lot of the markers are needlessly duplicative (several different sets of digits 0-9, for example), a surprising waste from cost-conscious Milton Bradley.
 
THE PRICE IS RIGHT
(Milton Bradley 1986)
CONTENTS:
    Four "pricers" for use in the Qualifying Rounds and Showcase (pictured unassembled)
    Five double-sided game cards
    32 plastic tiles for use with various pricing games (pictured unused)
    Four color-coded decks of prize cards
    One deck with Any Number values on one side, Switcheroo values on the other
    Milton Bradley Bucks
 
GAME PLAY:
        MB finally got many things right this time by carefully choosing which pricing games to adapt.  Instead of hundreds of tiny cardboard chips, the pricing games are played with a handful of nice plastic pieces.  Also, instead of separate decks for each pricing game, all the games use the same cards which are now sorted by value: (Purple=under $5, Green=under $100, Blue=under $1000 and Orange=under $10,000)
Pricing games featured in this edition: BUT HOW ARE THE PRICES DETERMINED?
        All prize cards have four possible values, the host decides which one to use before each pricing game. The Any Number/Switcheroo deck has dozens of values to use for those games.
 
DIFFERENCES TO TV SHOW:
        As with the earlier MB editions, each player tries to win every Qualifying Round, so one player might end up playing several pricing games before she's through.  The rules say to play every pricing game, which could make for one long night of TPIR action.  There is no Showcase Showdown.
 
COMMENTS:
        Vast improvement over the seventies editions, despite the inexplicable absence of a Big Wheel spinner.  Game play flows a lot faster, rules are easy to follow and the nice pieces are so much easier to handle.
THE PRICE IS RIGHT
(Endless Games 1999*)
(*The game carries a 1998 copyright, but was released in the fall of 1999)
 
The first new board game based on TPIR in thirteen years turned out not to be a new one at all.  It was a cheap replica of the 1986 Milton Bradley version, with identical pricing games and rules, but with cardboard chips instead of plastic markers.  There's no real point in describing it in great detail, just refer to the information above.
 
CHANGES FROM 1986 EDITION:
        A handful of prizes were updated to reflect modern times (laser printer, rollerblades).  Cars were removed from the orange (under $10,000) deck, but the two games played for cars (Any Number and Switcheroo) still used four digits for the car prices, which were as low as $5,039!  Since the cars were removed from the orange deck, the Showcases could never include a car, which is extremely inconsistant with the TV show.  The game was supposed to come with four "pricers" for the qualifying game, but only included one (a packaging error according to Endless).
 
COMMENTS:
        If you're going to use an earlier version as your model, the 1986 game was the right choice, but to make a virtual carbon copy of it was a disappointing effort from Endless.  Most egregious was the lack of a Showcase Showdown spinner and the absurd continued use of four-digit prices for the car games. But then the most interesting thing happened....
THE PRICE IS RIGHT Second Edition
(Endless Games 2004*)
(* We know it came out in late 2004, but there doesn't appear to be a copyright date on any of the materials!)
Unlike most Second Editions, this version was a complete redesign of the game, which warrants a separate listing.

CONTENTS:
    Instruction and Prize Booklets
    Pricing Game spinner
    Showcase Showdown spinner
    Standard playing cards
    Number cards (Four each 0-9)
    Special cards for certain pricing games
    Dry erase boards for certain pricing games
    Five dice
    Cliff Hangers board with "Hans" the Mountain Climber token
    Scorecards and markers
    Eight $1 play money bills (for Lucky Seven, and presumably a spare)
 
GAME PLAY:
Using those materials, the instruction booklet tells you how to play a whopping 45 pricing games, plus separate rules for Contestants Row, the Showcase Showdown (yay, a spinner!) and Showcases.  The games are recreated as faithfully as is practical in a home version, though some (Plinko as a card game?) make less sense than others.  The Pricing Game spinner determines which game will be played in each round.
 
BUT HOW ARE THE PRICES DETERMINED?
The prize booklet contains actual brand names and actual retail prices for hundreds of prizes used on the TV show during the first few months of its 32nd season (Fall 2003).  They're grouped into Grocery Items (less than $10), Small Prizes ($10-$500), Medium Prizes ($500-$3000), Large Prizes ($3,000-$10,000), Cars, and fully-assembled Showcases.  The host selects prizes for each game as needed.
 
DIFFERENCES TO TV SHOW:
For once, not very many.  The rules give you instructions for playing with any number of players, and of course the TV show carefully selects which pricing games are played each day rather than depending on a spinner to choose them.  There is so much more to the TV show than the relatively simple little pricing games that could never be duplicated at home, but as far as playing the games is concerned, this is the way to do it.
 
COMMENTS:
By far the best and most faithful recreation to date.  Playing with actual prices eliminates a lot of the randomness of earlier versions, but you do run the risk of a know-it-all memorizing some of the prices.  I still wish the Endless Games materials didn't rattle around loose in the box, and with more pieces, this game rattles more than most.  Still, that's a minor thing.
 
In the instruction booklet, Endless Games thanks Travis Schario, "avid fan and former contestant" for his help in the design of the game.  According to various internet reports, Schario's contributions were substantial.  The instruction booklet is also filled with interesting TPIR trivia and behind-the-scenes information.